Just Because You’re Invited, Doesn’t Mean You’re Welcome

The other night my better half and I watched “Get Out”, a horror / thriller movie from writer / director Jordan Peele in his directorial debut.

Daniel Kaluuya & Allison Williams

The film opens with a young black man walking down the street in the suburbs late one night, clearly slightly lost, and we see him get abducted by someone. The significance of this becomes apparent later in the movie. Next we meet black photographer Chris Washington (Daniel Kaluuya – “Sicario”, “Johnny English Reborn”) and his white girlfriend Rose Armitage (Allison Williams – “Girls”, “College Musical”) as they discuss their imminent trip to spend the weekend at Rose’s parents house in the country.

Bradley Whitford & Catherine Keener

Chris has not yet met her parents but Rose assures him that even though they don’t know that he is black they are not racist and it will be a problem-free experience. Arriving at the house Chris is reassured to find that he is made to feel welcome my Rose’s parents – neurosurgeon Dean (Bradley Whitford – “Saving Mr. Banks”, “The Cabin In The Woods”) and hypnotherapist Missy (Catherine Keener – “The Interpreter”, “Into The Wild”) – though Rose’s brother Jeremy (Caleb Landry Jones – “Contraband”, “Antiviral”) seems a little intense.

Caleb Landry Jones

However it’s when Chris meets the Armitage’s black servants Walter (Marcus Henderson – “Whiplash”, “Halfway”) and Georgina (Betty Gabriel – “The Purge – Election Year”, “Experimenter”) that he begins to notice that things don’t seem quite right as their demeanour is decidedly odd.

Betty Gabriel & Marcus Henderson

An annual get together at the Armitage house is taking place that weekend too, and when the guests turn up Chris meets Logan King (Lakeith Stanfield – “Straight Outta Compton”, “Snowden”), another black man who behaves rather unusually.

Lakeith Stanfield

To say more about the plot would be something of a spoiler, so I’ll avoid doing so. What I will say, though, is that I thought that this was a really well handled movie that explored racism from ordinary middle-class white folk and from police officers (extremely topical, particularly, stateside of late) and manages to turn many typical horror movie conventions upside down whilst still remaining gripping and entertaining. Performance-wise, all the leads do a good job but Kaluuya is particularly effective and impressive in his role as Chris.

Daniel Kaluuya, Allison Williams & Jordan Peele

My wife did her regular media-stacking trick of reading up online about the film even as we watched it, so was able to tell me as the final credits rolled that the original ending was less upbeat than the final version, and although the planned version would have arguably have been more realistic and in keeping with the rest of the film I can understand the reasons for Peele making the change and think it means that the conclusion is an easier watch. Either way, however, this is a very good film that makes an uncomfortable subject matter accessible and gives the viewer plenty to think and talk about. Recommended viewing…

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s