Tag Archives: Pendulum

You Have One Chance. Run

“You wake. Confused. Disorientated. A noose is round your neck. You are bound, standing on a chair. All you can focus on is the man in the mask tightening the rope. You are about to die.

John Wallace has no idea why he has been targeted. No idea who his attacker is. No idea how he will prevent the inevitable.

Then the pendulum of fate swings in his favour. He has one chance to escape, find the truth and halt his destruction. The momentum is in his favour for now. But with a killer on his tail, everything can change with one swing of this deadly pendulum…

You have one chance. Run…”

9781472236159

It’s been a while since I posted last. Life’s been busy. Not least because we’ve been involved in our second house move inside a year (we’re now in our fifth home since moving to the Forest of Dean in 2011!). The ability to move more regularly is one of the benefits of renting rather than buying, but of the course the uncertainty is equally one of the negatives and that was born out by our last house move last summer when our then-landlords decided to sell the house that we were living in. Hopefully, all being well, this latest move will turn out to be a long-term home – it certainly suits us more as a family, with plenty of space for all concerned (including the horses, chickens, etc.) and is in a fabulous countryside location so fingers crossed!…

Anyway, during the past few weeks I have been making my way through British author Adam Hamdy‘s latest crime thriller novel “Pendulum”, and what a great read it turned out to be.

Some reviewers have said that they felt that the book was too long and rather unrealistic. I must admit that the book did seem to take a long time to read, but given that I’ve not managed to find much time to sit and read for very long I assumed that was the reason that it seemed so. As for unrealistic – well, yes, Wallace’s knack of evading death at the hands of his killer numerous times, whilst the killer ruthlessly and expertly dispatches dozens of other characters, does stretch credibility somewhat.

Despite that, I thought this was a strong story with an intriguing and inventive plotline. Wallace thought that he was perhaps being targeted as a consequence of his time photographing British soldiers – and their crimes – in conflicts in the Middle East, but what then linked him to other potential victims? I certainly didn’t figure it out, or have any idea of the killer’s identity, until the writer wanted me to.

Adam Hamdy
Adam Hamdy

There were plenty of strands to the story to gradually bring together and, again, Hamdy achieves that really well.

Now, I don’t usually get too much into the plot of novels, especially the latter stages of them, when writing about them here. However, I’m going to make a rare exception here, so…

Spoiler alert!…

The root cause of the crimes depicted in “Pendulum” is connected with the internet, and specifically the social media side of things. A couple of passages from when the killer reveals their motivation really stood out for me as being so true with regard to the negative side of the world wide web that I’m quoting them, as follows… “…pornography in every bedroom. Gambling in every home. Children watching people being decapitated. Watching other kids being abused or killed. Murdering friends to please a Slender Man. Secret markets for drugs, weapons, body parts…” and then a little further on “…human existence has changed beyond all recognition. The internet exposes every single one of us to the entire world. All the good. All the evil. None of us were prepared for it… we can’t cope. A young teenage girl alone in her bedroom, vulnerable, searching for a place in the world… bombarded by a Twitter feed full of vacuous nonsense, by narcissistic Facebook friends timelining the illusion of their perfect lives… There’s a mental health epidemic devouring people, making them vulnerable. And when… desperate to fit in, that young girl exposes herself to the world looking for approval, she’s hit by a barrage of hateful abuse…” Sadly, we see the results of such thoughtless and nasty abuse all the time in the news these days, and witness kids struggle with cyber bullying etc. all too often. I don’t know what the answer is, and I think it’s made all the more difficult for parents today as we didn’t have all these pressures when we ourselves were growing up.

Back to the review…

As I said, with a little leeway for the less believable moments this was a jolly good read, with plenty of research evident in the detail. There was one character left unresolved at the end of the book, so perhaps Mr. Hamdy is planning a sequel or two? For now, though, I’ll finish by saying that despite the aforementioned slight misgivings “Pendulum” is a well recommended read…btm